International news dating back to 2016

19 Nov

It provides a detailed update on global climate indicators, notable weather events, and other data collected by environmental monitoring stations and instruments located on land, water, ice, and in space.

The report’s climate indicators show patterns, changes, and trends of the global climate system.

report confirmed that 2016 surpassed 2015 as the warmest year in 137 years of recordkeeping.

Last year’s record heat resulted from the combined influence of long-term global warming and a strong El Niño early in the year. Several markers such as land and ocean temperatures, sea level, and greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere broke records set just one year prior.

On September 10, the Arctic sea ice annual minimum extent tied with 2007 for the second lowest value on record, at 1.60 million square miles, 33 percent smaller than average.

Arctic sea ice cover remains relatively young and thin, making it vulnerable to continued extensive melt.

Globally, upper ocean heat content saw a slight drop compared to the record high set in 2015, but reflected the continuing accumulation of thermal energy in the top 2,300 feet (700 meters) of the ocean.

In the region of the atmosphere just above Earth’s surface, the globally averaged lower troposphere temperature was highest on record.

Increasing temperatures have led to decreasing Arctic sea ice extent and thickness.

On March 24, the smallest annual maximum sea ice extent in the 37-year satellite record was observed, tying with 2015 at 5.61 million square miles, 7.2% below the 1981–2010 average.

The increased hydrologic cycle was also reflected, as it has been for more than a decade, by patterns of salinity (saltiness) across the globe’s ocean surface.

The report also documents key regional climate and climate-related events.